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how-to-wire [2019/07/03 23:48]
76.72.81.63 [Size] Changed isolation to insulation
how-to-wire [2019/08/14 12:21]
78.23.26.240 [Electricity 101]
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 First thing to mention is the fact that there are different electrical laws in different countries. First thing to mention is the fact that there are different electrical laws in different countries.
 They can be very (too) strict to irrelevant (dangerous),​ different units or different colors. They can be very (too) strict to irrelevant (dangerous),​ different units or different colors.
-This guide tries to be as global as possible but don't take foe granted that everything will apply in your country.+This guide tries to be as global as possible but don't take for granted that everything will apply in your country.
 If you have any doubts, please refer to your local rules. If you have any doubts, please refer to your local rules.
  
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 Wire's size (cross-section) determines how much current you can safely pass through. An under-sized wired will generate heat and insulation can melt leading to short circuit or catch fire. When I doubt, one rule: **Bigger is safer !** Wire's size (cross-section) determines how much current you can safely pass through. An under-sized wired will generate heat and insulation can melt leading to short circuit or catch fire. When I doubt, one rule: **Bigger is safer !**
  
-There is different ways to speak of wire's sizes. The two mains are AWG (for American Wire Gauge) and mm^^2^^ (metric system). AWG's notation is followed by a number. Don't get confuse, a greater number ​indicate ​a smaller wire diameter and and a small number ​bigger wire. You can find conversion charts between the two units online but what interest ​us more is how much amps each size can carry:+There is different ways to speak of wire's sizes. The two mains are AWG (for American Wire Gauge) and mm^^2^^ (metric system). AWG's notation is followed by a number. Don't get confused, a greater number ​indicates ​a smaller wire diameter and and a small number ​indicates ​bigger wire. You can find conversion charts between the two units online but what interests ​us more is how many amps each size can carry:
  
  
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 Tier 2 - Hotend Heaters, bigger motor (more than 1.5A like NEMA23), Mains of power supply, 230VAC heat pads Tier 2 - Hotend Heaters, bigger motor (more than 1.5A like NEMA23), Mains of power supply, 230VAC heat pads
 > AWG12-18 or 1.5-2.5mm^^2^^ > AWG12-18 or 1.5-2.5mm^^2^^
-Tier 3 - low voltage heat pads (12-24VDC) or any amps-hungry element+Tier 3 - low voltage heat pads (12-24VDC) or any current-hungry ​(high amperage) ​element
 > AWG10 and more or 2.5mm^^2^^ and more > AWG10 and more or 2.5mm^^2^^ and more